In all situations ask: what would a toddler do?

Archive for March, 2011

All by myself

I’ve noticed lately (or maybe for a while!) how often Maayan says that she wants to do things by herself.

Opening the door, pressing the elevator button, getting in the car, opening the milk, the orange juice, the mail, clicking the “call” button on Skype, taking in the groceries, sweeping the floor, doing the dishes, talking on the phone, writing a note, throwing a ball, doing yoga, turning the key, pouring the water, getting the cup and shovelling the snow.

I can’t speak for other parents, but personally I feel how tremendous this is. A 4-year-old wants to do things by herself, as difficult as it may be.

Many things are not easy for a toddler to do. Pouring water or milk is a little heavy, the car is big, the door is big, the sink is high, the keyhole is small, the snow is heavy and the broom is too big. Despite all the challenge and difficulty in a 4-year-old doing these things, Maayan has a drive to just do it.

Independence is a tough thing for a parent to give, but a crucial and essential thing for a toddler to receive. They must do things by themselves. They must grow, they must learn, they must become the “I” word: Independent.

Adults seem to have it backwards though. Adults see success as when everyone is doing things for them. Having an assistant to make them coffee, a personal driver to drive them places, hired help for the kitchen and laundry.

Why do adults want others to do things for them while toddlers want to do things all by themselves?

Adults would benefit a lot from getting out of the “adult” mindset and stepping into a fresh and clean toddler mindset. Not to rely or depend on others to get things done, but to do it yourself. Not to ask your assistant to make you a cup of coffee, but to get up and make it yourself. Not to wait for the world to serve you. Instead, you serve the world.

As soon as adults start seeing success in serving others and stop seeing it as others serve them, we’ll be living life on a whole new level.  We’ll stop being people who wait and complain, who whine and don’t shine. We’ll start to be doers, movers, thinkers, innovators and creators. Yes, we’ll be like toddlers.

Life lesson of a toddler #28: Don’t wait for things to happen to you. Do it all by yourself.

Advertisements

Of Castles & Princesses

Maayan went to see the Canada Games a few weeks ago. She was treated to see the figure skating. The figure eights, the jumps, the spins, the grace – the outfit. Maayan took one look at these skaters and said, “They look like a princess”.

Everything seems to be within the context of royalty, majesty, princes and princesses. Even today we went to the library which is adjacent to a very big building. Maayan took one look at that building and said, “It looks like a castle”.

There is this innate vision within toddlers to see something magical within the practical. An inherent sense of amazing within everything they see. A building is a castle, a figure skater is a princess. Life is amazing & filled with wonder. For a toddler, the natural state is a miraculous one. Civilians are all royalty and every building a castle.

We don’t know for sure, but at some point adults begin to move away from the sense of the magical. Getting degrees and jobs, paying bills and mortgages, feeling pain and frustration in the world. Adults see buildings as buildings and skaters as skaters – if adults even look. Adults are always busy, always doing, not always looking up to see a bigger picture.

Toddlers don’t live in a different world than adults do, they just see it differently. They interpret what they see to be magical, wonderful and inspiring. Adults also interpret, but without focus and work, it’s often less than magical or miraculous.

Adults have a lot to learn from toddlers. One of the most important is to remember that we’re always interpreting our lives and what we see. It is not the situation that is different but in how we define and interpret the situation. Adults need to be aware of the fact that we’re always defining our reality, and that it’s not always in their favor. Adults would look at a building and say, “So? So it’s a building. It has a function, end of story”. Why not look for the amazing and the miraculous? To appreciate the architecture, the form, the beauty – the castle that only a toddler sees.

The truth is that all of life, every single detail is absolutely a gift and a miracle. A leaf, a breath, a hug, a smile, ice skates and buildings. They’re here for us to enjoy. We’ll be able to when we live like a toddler.

Life lesson of a toddler #27: See everything as magical, royal and beautiful. Buildings are castles and skaters are princesses.

Waking up in the morning

It’s not easy to get up in the morning. Hey, we’re just waking up, feeling heavy, a little dizzy, wanting another five minute of blissful sleep, where’s the coffee already!

This is all a daily occurrence for people – unless you’re a toddler.

There are a number of very inspiring ways how toddlers wake up. First of all (as long as they go to bed on time and sleep through the night) they wake up happy. Every morning, my wonderful daughters are just happy. Our 18 month old Yarden gives an initial cry, but that’s just to get out of the crib. Once out, it’s go time. And they’re all smiles.

This morning Yarden woke up earlier than usual, about an hour before Maayan around 6am. As soon as I picked Yarden up she smiled, looked at her sister and said, “Maya!”. That’s right, we’re happy to be up and we’re sharing the joy.

Maayan has also developed a little routine. Since the fall (when it’s still dark out at 7am in Halifax), she waits for the sky to turn colors. She wakes up by herself, turns on the lights in her room, puts her head back on the pillow and watches the colors change. “Look, it’s changing colors”, she says. As soon as it’s bright enough, she gets up and says, “It’s day time now”.

Happy. Relaxed. Enjoying the beautiful sky. Soaking it in. Saying hi to anyone in the room. This is how a toddler begins their day.

Adults have a thing or two to learn from toddlers. Too many adults wake up like the world is on fire. Rush out of bed, throw down the caffeine, worry about work.

I think too many adults wake up like chickens with their heads cut off, while toddlers seem to be gracious little Queens of an empire.

While it’s true that thank God many adults wake up early, exercise, take time to themselves before they give it to others, we’re waiting for it to go viral. It is so crucial to begin one’s day happy and relaxed, giving some serious quality time to yourself.

Imagine how different everyone’s day would be if they began it by waking up a little earlier (which also means going to sleep earlier), going for a walk outside, focusing on the amazing blessings of our lives, thinking about our goals, our dreams and how we can make it happen today.

Instead of waking up in a craze and daze, let’s wake up early with joy & gratitude. A colorful sky can do wonders to a person who loses themselves in the grandeur and the beauty. Soaking the blessings in. With that, we’ll be living a totally inspired and amazing life because we’ll be living like a toddler.

Life lesson of a toddler #26: Go to bed early & wake up early. Wake up with joy & gratitude. Go outside and appreciate the brilliant & colorful sky in the morning.

Small pieces

Have you ever paid attention to adults when they eat? Of course everyone is different, but in general, it’s not a pretty sight. Not that it’s an ugly one God forbid, but it’s just not something you enjoy watching. I can’t put my finger on it, but watching adults eat food is not always an experience you’re looking for.

 

The opposite is true with toddlers: it’s pure pleasure to watch them eat! They eat so slowly, they chew each bite with such precision and effort. They enjoy it. They don’t gulp it down, swallow it whole or rush the meal. They eat with such royal grace, dignity and ease.

 

Another important thing is the size. Everything is in small pieces. Today I made cheese sandwiches for lunch. For Maayan, who is already 4, I gave her two full slices. For Yarden, who is 18 months old, I cut it into very small pieces. Those little pieces are eaten with ease, calm & comfort. One at a time, there’s no rush, no hurry, nowhere to go. They’re in the moment and enjoying it to its’ fullest.

 

If you have some time, I would suggest studying toddlers as they eat. Notice the patterns, the motions, the grace. Pay attention to how long it takes and how little they eat. Make sure you’re aware of how different it is from how adults eat. Enjoy it, love it, eat it up. But know that you can be like them too.

 

Life lesson of a toddler #25: Cut up your food into small pieces & eat slowly to enjoy every bite.

Band Aids

I had a small paper cut on my wrist (a.k.a boo boo). While for many people that might not seem like such a big deal, for a toddler it is a rare opportunity to employ one of the greatest inventions of mankind: the band aid.

There is a whole medical procedure for toddlers when it comes to boo boos. First, a toddler begins with asking, “Where does it hurt?” After pointing to the exact location of the boo boo, the toddler kisses it and asks, “Is that better?”

Upon conclusive evidence that the kiss has in fact improved the situation, the toddler makes a move for the medical cabinet. Forget about pills, antiseptics, sterile gauzes or wipes. For a toddler, the only thing a boo boo needs is a band aid.

As Maayan was handling her patient (me), as soon as the band aid was on, everything was healed. That was it. Maayan didn’t ask about my cut again. Once the band aid goes on, there is no more need for concern.

The band aid takes care of all pain.

When it comes to boo boos, toddlers say to just put on a band aid. Do what you can do with a lot of love and then don’t worry about it. Sometimes, all we need is for someone to ask what’s hurting us, give us a kiss and put on the band aid of no need to worry. Everything will be fine.

Then go play.

Life lesson of a toddler #24: If you see someone in pain, ask them where it hurts. Then give them a band aid. Even if their pain isn’t physical, giving someone a band aid always helps.