In all situations ask: what would a toddler do?

Archive for the ‘toddler’ Category

Snuggle Time

Recently, Maayan and I have been doing a lot of quality time snuggling & cuddling. With happy and loving eyes says to me, “Let’s snuggle.” How can a father say no?

Prior to going to sleep, in the afternoon or even when just waking up are all fantastic opportunities for snuggling. I told Maayan that she’s getting really good at snuggling. She said, “yeah“.

Snuggling is a very important activity for toddlers. It consists of hanging out, cuddling up, relaxing and enjoying your family.

Snuggling can be done at anytime of the day. Many people worry that they don’t have enough time in the day or that they should wait until they’re on vacation. That myth can be laid to rest my friends, because toddlers have proven time and again that snuggling and cuddling can be done at anytime of the day or week. All it takes is a few minutes.

Another misconception about snuggling is that you have to be a professional. I’ve often heard from adults who say that they don’t invest in snuggling because they’re not good at it or that it should be left for the professionals. Someone even said that snuggling is only for toddlers and cannot be done by adults. Once again, that is only a myth and is not based on any real evidence. In fact, all of the toddler’s research show that you don’t have to be a professional to snuggle. Anyone can do it. No matter what your level or age, you can snuggle and you will reap major benefits.

The proven method for most effectiveness is to just lie down next to your toddler or someone you love. Turn off all cell phones, computers and TV’s. Smile, relax and enjoy.

Life lesson of a toddler # 29: Cuddle up & Snuggle with someone you love today.

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Small pieces

Have you ever paid attention to adults when they eat? Of course everyone is different, but in general, it’s not a pretty sight. Not that it’s an ugly one God forbid, but it’s just not something you enjoy watching. I can’t put my finger on it, but watching adults eat food is not always an experience you’re looking for.

 

The opposite is true with toddlers: it’s pure pleasure to watch them eat! They eat so slowly, they chew each bite with such precision and effort. They enjoy it. They don’t gulp it down, swallow it whole or rush the meal. They eat with such royal grace, dignity and ease.

 

Another important thing is the size. Everything is in small pieces. Today I made cheese sandwiches for lunch. For Maayan, who is already 4, I gave her two full slices. For Yarden, who is 18 months old, I cut it into very small pieces. Those little pieces are eaten with ease, calm & comfort. One at a time, there’s no rush, no hurry, nowhere to go. They’re in the moment and enjoying it to its’ fullest.

 

If you have some time, I would suggest studying toddlers as they eat. Notice the patterns, the motions, the grace. Pay attention to how long it takes and how little they eat. Make sure you’re aware of how different it is from how adults eat. Enjoy it, love it, eat it up. But know that you can be like them too.

 

Life lesson of a toddler #25: Cut up your food into small pieces & eat slowly to enjoy every bite.

Band Aids

I had a small paper cut on my wrist (a.k.a boo boo). While for many people that might not seem like such a big deal, for a toddler it is a rare opportunity to employ one of the greatest inventions of mankind: the band aid.

There is a whole medical procedure for toddlers when it comes to boo boos. First, a toddler begins with asking, “Where does it hurt?” After pointing to the exact location of the boo boo, the toddler kisses it and asks, “Is that better?”

Upon conclusive evidence that the kiss has in fact improved the situation, the toddler makes a move for the medical cabinet. Forget about pills, antiseptics, sterile gauzes or wipes. For a toddler, the only thing a boo boo needs is a band aid.

As Maayan was handling her patient (me), as soon as the band aid was on, everything was healed. That was it. Maayan didn’t ask about my cut again. Once the band aid goes on, there is no more need for concern.

The band aid takes care of all pain.

When it comes to boo boos, toddlers say to just put on a band aid. Do what you can do with a lot of love and then don’t worry about it. Sometimes, all we need is for someone to ask what’s hurting us, give us a kiss and put on the band aid of no need to worry. Everything will be fine.

Then go play.

Life lesson of a toddler #24: If you see someone in pain, ask them where it hurts. Then give them a band aid. Even if their pain isn’t physical, giving someone a band aid always helps.

Before there was me

Today Maayan said, “After Hashem (God, meaning “the Name”, as traditionally said in Judaism) fixed me, I had feet and hands. Then Hashem fixed my sister.”

 

Although I don’t have the clearest recollection of what my life was like before I was born, Maayan seems to have a pretty good grasp on things. My little 4 year old is pretty comfortable in thinking of life before life and existence before having a body. I didn’t always have what I have, there was a time when it had to all come together and thankfully it did.

 

What is so profound for me is how simple it is for a toddler. It is somehow obvious to a toddler how things were not always as they are. Maayan loves looking at herself as a baby. She is always saying how, “when I was a baby…”

 

Toddlers are cool with change. They see it all the time. They see baby pictures, smaller clothes and shoes without laces. They see other babies and older kids and are able to see themselves in context of consistent growth. Even more profoundly, at least in my own experience with my daughter, understanding what life was like before birth is as clear as a clear sippy cup.

 

Adults are not so fast with change, it’s a hard thing for them. Birthdays, as signs of change, are not fun for adults. Usually their cards are equipped with such phrases as “over the hill” or “it’s all downhill from here” and other references to hills, gravity and falling. Changes in jobs, relationships, presidents and TV shows are not taken with ease. Let alone thinking of life before life.

 

For toddlers however, change is a given. We didn’t always have what we have. Things used to be one way, now they’re another. At one point there was only me, now there are others. I was smaller, now I’m bigger and my shoes have laces. For a toddler, change is always happening and they’re happy with every move.

 

Life lesson of a toddler #22: Change happens, enjoy the ride & appreciate all the many gifts along the way.

 

Juice Boxes

There is something  that toddlers seem to enjoy more than anything else. It is something that is calming but exciting, something that always seems to be new. Something refreshing even if just after drinking something. That is the glorious juice box.

I’m not quite sure what it is either. Yes, I’ve been thinking about it. Maybe it’s the small package that is just appropriate for a toddler. Cans and bottles are too much. Containers like orange juice or milk are just a spill waiting to happen. Glass is dangerous. Aluminium is too rough and tough to deal with or even open. So it makes sense that toddlers opt for the smaller, more compatible and safer juice box. Hey, I throw one back every now and then….when no one’s watching.

There is another element about the juice box. This element separates it from every other product on the market that I’m aware of. That my friends is the straw.

The straw allows for a clean drink, no spill, easy on the teeth and just gets the job done. On top of all this, the straw is there to begin with! While beer bottles need a tool to be opened, soda cans are prone to opening it incorrectly and wine bottles an entire ordeal to open if you haven’t been trained by professionals – the juice box is catered for the rest of us.

I say we protest the difficulty of cans and bottles. Maybe beer, soda and wine aren’t drunk with straws. Maybe they need to be opened in fancy ways. You know what? Maybe we should change all that. Maybe, everyone should catch on to the simplicity of how toddlers live and consume their beverages. It all starts somewhere, today it can start with juice boxes. Bring your i.d.

Life lesson of a toddler #21: Drink more juice boxes. At the very least, use straws with any and every beverage. People will smile.

Sing a song & make your body happy

Driving home yesterday, Maayan began to sing a song. Although it had rhythm and rhyme, the words were not too familiar to me. I asked Maayan if it was from preschool, and it was not.

 

When we got out of the car, Maayan said to me, “Singing makes my whole body happy.” To which Maayan then slowly walked on the snow, dancing in her footsteps and singing the entire time.

 

Isn’t it so true? When we sing, it isn’t just our mouth that sings. We use our hands, we dance a little and ultimately our whole self feels it. We just feel better!

 

It’s a very powerful thing to sing. It is putting emotion into our words. If a person is happy, their words sound like a major. If a person is upset, their words are like a minor. If a person is really excited, the words make you feel excited. If a person says “Hello” but really wants to say, “I hate you” – we’ll feel it. And if a person says, “I am so upset” but is really calm and happy, we’ll feel it as well. We’re always singing because our whole body is doing it.

 

If we were to sing a happy song, we’ll become happy. If we listen to a totally energetic song, it will give us that energy. The more we sing, the more we feel that song. Why? Because it makes our whole body happy!

 

Life lesson of a toddler #20: Sing songs throughout the day, even make up your own. Your body will thank you.

 

Make a silly face

While we were sitting down at the table, Maayan says to me, “Let’s make silly faces.” Great idea!

 

Maayan did the first one and then asked me to. It was pretty funny, we were both cracking up. In all honesty, I have had some real life experience making silly faces. Back in the day I remember seeing a picture of Harpo Marx, Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin as Harpo made a hilarious face. His cheeks puffed, eyes crossed and tongue out made for a very inspiring face. As I did my best to live up to the great ones, Maayan laughed along with sheer enjoyment.

 

Silly faces are a fantastic way of opening up. Whether a person is in too serious of a mood, worried about the latest news or just in need of a good laugh – silly faces are the perfect antidote. They come highly recommended by toddlers.

 

In fact, toddlers are of the opinion that adults should be making silly faces on a more consistent basis. Studies have shown, they say, that silly faces can add years to one’s life and increase productivity as well. In the latest news, they have even recommended making silly faces in board rooms and business meetings. When things might get a little serious, silly faces can fix all that. Someone is encouraged to take the bull by the horns and in the middle of a meeting stand up and say, “Everyone, let’s make silly faces!”

 

Life lesson of a toddler #19: Make silly faces often. It is guaranteed to bring joy to your life!